Emed Multispecialty Group

Emed accepts all auto insurance and worker’s compensation for care so you don’t have to pay out of pocket when you have an accident. Make an appointment today!

Auto Insurance:

Link to Official Florida State Resource

When shopping for a policy, beware of terms such as “full coverage” and “what’s required.” What one considers “full coverage” or “what’s required” may differ from one person to the next. You should determine the type and amount of insurance you need. The following is the most common coverage available in Florida.

Bodily Injury Liability (BI) Coverage: pays for death or serious and permanent injury to others when you are legally liable for those damages. If you are sued, the insurer will provide legal representation until the insurer has paid the policy coverage limit.

Property Damage Liability (PD) Coverage: pays for damage to, or destruction of, tangible property of another, including loss of use, for which you are determined to be legally liable. If you are sued, the insurer will provide legal representation until the insurer has paid the policy coverage limit. Florida law requires a minimum of $10,000 of this type of coverage.

Personal Injury Protection (PIP) Coverage: pays 80 percent of all necessary and reasonable medical expenses incurred as a result of a covered injury, regardless of liability. This includes medically necessary medical, surgical, x-ray, dental, and rehabilitative services, including prosthetic devices and medically necessary ambulance, hospital, and nursing services. Payment is based on the fact an individual receives initial services and care within 14-days after the motor vehicle accident. Follow-up care is contingent on the covered person being diagnosed with an emergency medical injury. PIP also pays 60 percent of work loss and a $5,000 death benefit. The $5,000 death benefit is an additional amount of insurance.

Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist (UM) Coverage: pays you for an accidental bodily injury, sickness, or disease, including death, when such an injury is the result of an automobile accident and the at-fault party does not have Bodily Injury (BI) Coverage, or has insufficient liability limits. Unlike PIP benefits, UM benefits are typically paid as a lump sum once the full extent of treatment has been determined, or rendered.

Medical Payments (Med Pay) Coverage: pays for your reasonable expenses for necessary medical and/or funeral services due to a bodily injury or death sustained in an automobile accident, regardless of fault.

Comprehensive or Other than Collision Coverage: pays for damage to a vehicle from incidents other than a collision including: fire, theft, windstorm, vandalism or flood. It also covers damages caused by falling objects or from hitting an animal.

Collision Coverage: pays to repair your vehicle if it collides with another vehicle, flips over, or crashes into an object (except animals), regardless of fault. In the event that your vehicle is determined to be a total loss, the insurer will pay to replace it. The amount paid by the insurer is typically limited to the vehicle’s actual cash value (ACV), unless the specific value of the vehicle has been previously agreed to by both you and the insurer.

Towing & Labor Coverage: provides coverage for emergency road service (at the scene) and towing up to the limits shown on the policy.

Rental Reimbursement: provides for replacement transportation up to a specified limit shown on the policy. It applies if your vehicle is inoperable, or unsafe to operate following a covered loss. Some insurance companies will pay the rental vehicle provider directly, however others require that their insured pay the rental cost out of pocket, and submit receipts for reimbursement.

Worker’s Compensation:

Link to official Florida State resource

Workers’ Compensation is insurance coverage purchased by the employer/business that provides benefits for job-related employee injuries. Florida law requires all employers to purchase workers’ compensation coverage (with a few exceptions). Under a workers’ compensation policy, employees are compensated for occupationally incurred injuries, regardless of fault. This coverage makes employers immune from some injury lawsuits by employees. In Florida, the Division of Workers’ Compensation within the Department of Financial Services is the primary regulator for ensuring employees receive the proper benefits under this coverage, which includes benefits for medical expenses, disability, or death. The Office of Insurance Regulation primarily regulates the rates, forms and solvency for this type of coverage. The amount of compensation is established by law.